Paul Isaacs' Blog

Autism from the inside


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“Neurotypical”, Reverse-Bigotry & The Warped Lense Of Equality

 

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Not this is from personal experiences

“Neurotypical” Is Inaccurate & Misleading? 

The word Neurotypical is used to describe people who are “non-autistic” but what if we have got that all wrong? What if the barriers are being created by the assumptions of what “autism” is that then thrusting one’s own presumptions of what it is like to be “non-autistic”?  I think that there really is no such thing.

Bigotry Is Still Bigotry 

Reverse bigotry is still that bigotry and if someone is using the words “NT” or “Neurotypical” to dehumanise, belittle or bully someone then surely that very generalised assumption if wrong? How does that become validated? Is it a sense of one’s own self importance, ego, group think and conformation bias, upbringing and/or past experiences? What gives someone the right to say these things and not take social emotional impact it has on the people in question?

“Autistic Identity”

This has worryingly been created through a “narrow” bandwidth of what autism “is” and “isn’t” but also what being “non-autistic” “is” and “isn’t”. The truth is there are far more similarities between people than not so why over invest in stereotypes? Which in the long run give people  a generic tick list of “traits”?

More Voices? More Perspectives? 

If we created so many degrees of separation do we strive to lose our objectivity? Being grounded means looking at things from the angle of non-bias. I have seen too much militancy that means that some people’s experiences have been silenced because they have not fitted the status quo that means there is rhetoric and that is unhealthy. Equality is for everybody.

No one “owns” autism it is not a thing to be bought or sold, no one should be able to cherry pick what autism “should look like” because guess what? It doesn’t have a “look” and more you give it one ironically the more voices will be lost.

Paul Isaacs 2018


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The “Autistic Identity” Phenomena

When I was diagnosed was autism in 2010 – I wasn’t aware of such an “identity” because to honest I was never in that “world” at all. I often wonder that despite the obvious difficulties I had during my development and environment the one thing that I had going for me was the simple “human-hood” which was conveyed by the my parents as a way of connecting with me.

I don’t consider this perception from my parents to be “unique”, “specialised” or “autistic-specific” in its intentions nor in its thinking at the time (although it could have well be seen as that on reflection).

I wasn’t born with a “label”

In many of my blogs I have spoken about the balance of being seen as “human”, “person” and “being” first and as I have been in this “world” for over five years. I have seen the firm importance of seeing people as “people”, by not defining their whole “soul”, “identity”, “being” by their label (or labels) nor having it being overtly defined for them so there is nothing else left.

“Labels” are an adjective not an overall definition

If everybody was to be defined by solely by a “label” wouldn’t it be restrictive, suffocating and narrowing your bandwidth of experiences, perceptions, thoughts and feelings?

Not towing line meant I could see “myself”

I am glad that I haven’t towed the line into the realms of stereotypes, group think, confirmation bias and all the militancy that goes with it. I am glad that my parents after I was diagnosed said that I am still “Paul” regardless. I am glad that I see the importance of seeing somone as a person first. I am glad that I have other interests that take up my time productively such as drawing, poetry, walks in the countryside and meeting up with friends.

People are people regardless

I am free to think and feel and have a more refined outlook that I am firstly and thankfully not being the centre of the universe, not the big answer all  to the questions, not speaking for “all” (because no one can) and have a egalitarian view that all people are of equal worth in this world no more and certainly no less.

Paul Isaacs 2016


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“Autism” – It Is Different For Everybody

“Autism” what is it?

Fruit Salad Analogy Copyright D.Williams

Fruit Salad Analogy Copyright D.Williams

Autism is word for a clustering of different co-conditions that come together to create the “presentation” and therefore when one uses the word “Autism” it should be specific it what that means for the person themselves and what the “mechanics” are no one is the same so why should one condition mean that everybody has the same viewpoints? Profiles? Processing issues? and outlook – realities and perceptions.

Stereotypes – Are They Damaging?

If a “one size fits all” perception of autism then yes – it will affect outlooks, mental health, interventions, motivations, opinions (created and/or forced) not all people on the autism spectrum are logical, literal thinkers/processors, not all are visual thinkers/processors and everyone on the spectrum has their own unique wants, needs and aspirations it not about setting someone up for a fall or failing to recognise a person because they don’t “fit in”.

Lines Culture or Created Culture?

Anybody can create a culture it can start off with an ideal and/or ethos that then becomes reality – I don’t believe that autism is a different culture and never have done. What I do see is a culture being created around autism. Which is a different thing altogether.I am all  and firmly for equality, humanity, humility and happiness. And for people on the spectrum (like everyone else in the world) to have an equal shot at life and have opportunities.

What I am not for is false prophets, venomous politics,  militancy (from culturists and curists) – I prefer to be neutral and through that you can see both sides in balances democratic manner, selfishness and so forth all voices have a right to heard, acknowledged and recognised – disagreement is fine but at what point does one go too far? I have made this point in previous blogs that I think that the autism world will eventually implode on itself and how many people on and off the spectrum suffer as result? Just because they didn’t “tow the line” or “say the right things” Will it be just the same sycophancy? Or will all (people on and off the spectrum’s) view’s be heard? I wonder? Let’s stop the man-made barriers and start listening to ALL peoples views.

I am not angry but I am upset – not really for me but for the others who will be affected.

Paul Isaacs 2015