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Autism from the inside


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Autism – Communication Beyond Speech? Sensing A System Before Interpretation With Sharon King

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Sharon King Speech is only the tip of the iceberg. There are many more ways to communicate

Paul Isaacs I have had many a good conversation about Sharon with regards to the “system” of “sensing” a world before “you”, “I”, “self”, “ego” etc. All human beings go through this developmental phase some people on the autism spectrum stay (to varying and differing degrees) in this framework. A world before cladding and concepts that build on to some degree intellectual understanding vs. introspection. If someone is still in this system they may well pick up on things/situations/emotions that are raw, they may see other functions for things rather than its “interpretive use”. 🙂

Paul Isaacs For example I would use the toilet an its flush system as a “toy” a place to contextualise, a place to feel and get “sensory/chemical highs”, I used shaving foam, litres of bubble bath to create patterns on the tiled surfaces for hours and hours, would/do take in the smells of nature around, its textures, its feeling. I have learnt that some people want to know how you are feeling this moment, at this time and in which order that doesn’t make their system wrong as it is system they are using just as much I am using mine so I think there are more degrees of humanity between people who are on and off the autism spectrum than people actually think. Boxes only muddy the issue. I also think there are many people off the spectrum who live in this system of sensing as well.

My World = One’s Own World. This is our first world. Before all of its later cladding and contortions, it is at first a place of sensing, beingness, the preconscious mind and unknown knowing. It is the place where we understand self in others and others in self through the skill of mergence.

The External World = The physical world known through our sensory experiences as processed through our bodies/brains and experienced as sensations, thoughts, emotions, connections. This is a directly hands on world where sensing and beingness may be relatively strongly intact.

The Interpretive World = the world of applied meaning to incoming experiences that progressively builds mental structures and frameworks that ultimately filter our direct sensed experiences of the physical world and develops conscious mind as the primary guide.

Ego World = Ego contortion that further clads, alters and filters the logical meaning we get from experiences of the physical world and further buries our original capacity for sensing and beingness. This can be indoctrination, culture, economics, identifications, rewards, honed addictions and competition for social, economic, cultural ‘currency’.

Donna Williams

Sharon King Sometimes I wonder if feelings are more real than the external reality as they are our first point of contact being ‘within’ and everything else is ‘without’ to be filtered through our senses.

Paul Isaacs I FEEL before I interpret so its almost like a translation with knowing on a conscious level translating. The main difference I see between auties and aspies is the the system of sensing (to some degree) is far more “there” this also is taking into account the information processing blockages that come with that.

For example my Father is very much OPPOSITE he build up frameworks first, concepts first and then feeling and reflections come second. Its in the end a differing system of understanding information around you.

Paul Isaacs 2018


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In Conversation With Sharon King – Autism Speaker, Author, Advocate & Mum

I first met the Kings in 2016 this was somewhat of an interesting meeting of minds, I was nervous it was my first speech/training session as a freelance speaker and it was in Telford at a National Autsitic Society Event. Her daugther Rosie diagnosed with Asperger’s Sydnrome was introducing the speakers in the main hall. I had seen Sharon and her family over the years on social media.

She was in the audience during one of my sessons and we sat down during one of the intervals to chat with her daughter Rosie. They were both very warm, friendly and welcoming I then went to their home the same year to do consultancy sessions with her son and daughter Lenny who was diagnosed with classic autism and Daisy who was diagnosed with Kabuki Syndrome.

It was a pleasure to meet them all including Sharon’s husband Richard who with their charming and down to earth manner it was had left me with a positive and reflective on impression and we have became all beomce friends. Sharon has since of 2017 publised a book “How To Best Help An Autism Mum.”

Sharon’s Ethos

What would you like staff to know about people with autism?

That each person with autism is an individual. Anyone who believes themselves to be an autism expert needs to get humble and go back to learning. The greatest barrier to learning is the assumption that we know everything.

What support benefited you the most as a Mum?

The greatest support has come from my children and othet individuals with autism who I have befriended. An arena of respect is where the best parenting happens. X

Further Conversation

Sharon King

I think. One of the most helpful things I have learned is not to take Daisy and Lenny’s behaviours personally. It is quite freeing. Ie ~ ‘this is happening, how can I deal with it?’ As opposed to ‘this is happening to me…poor me!’

Paul Isaacs

Yes I agree ever take things on the personal because it largely isn’t even the swearing and being bitten doesn’t bother once you know where it comes from.

Sharon King

Yeh like rubbing crap (with regards to smearing) into radiator nor personal ~ just a bit smelly! X

Paul Isaacs

Haha Humour is an ally! I used to urinate in the bath in my infancy I liked how the colour changed in the water I also got confused and would treat my bath as a “very large toilet” it looked like a duck, sounded like a duck so I thought it was a duck no? That is context blindness

Sharon King

At least you admit to it lots of ppl do it in secret! X

Paul Isaacs

Haha 🙂 The sods 😀This conversation proves that open-mindness is the key
open doors rather than closed.
Of course poo smearing can have different motivations for some it could exposure anxiety and keeping “people at bay“.
For others it could be to do with severe sensory perceptual and/or language processing difficulties.
For some it could be to do with addiction, habitual and compulsive in nature.
For others it could be to do with co-dependency.
One “behaviour” can have multiple reasons why. 😉

 

Sharon King

I think with Lenny it stems from a genuine interest and delight in textures x

Paul Isaacs

Sensory perception yes 😊

Its been a very interesting chat as always Sharon as there certainly is a positive an objective theme going on here with your permission could I use your answers on a blog? This then can be put on your page. 🙂

Copied with kind permession of Sharon King

Paul Isaacs 2018

 


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Book Review How to Best Help an Autism Mum By Sharon King

Image result for Sharon King How best

BOOK REVIEW

Sharon brings to the life a world in which people need to know about and the confines of subjection opened up deeper and emotion as a well placed flower, gathering water and sun in equal measure. Sometimes people do not realise the awareness and complexity of the flower and sundered people look back tracking the enlightenment and darkness as forms of reflectivity and an eternal promise of and finding of happiness and stability. Through expereince one does grow and Sharon presents her own beautiful journey of grownth to the eager reader.

Sharon conveys deep emotional introspection and wit in equal measure and she takes us on a journey that is like dark chocolate mixed with sugar bitter sweet and to her own admission it is so as she explains that with glorious and saddening anecdotes, personal examples and gentle direction to aid, advise not only the autism mum but the friends and family around her.

She talks of her feelings of her three children being all diagnosed on the autism spectrum, her husband, family and friends with a whole family dynamic in tow opening up a social context to which autism should and has to be put in. How else would one learn of differing forests and pastures not trod? Unless the delving experience hasn’t been shared to others? Sharon’s wit, desire, vitality, vulnerability, realism and clear devotion to her family burst forth from page to page.

I highly recommend this book to people on the spectrum parents, siblings and professional to let lose parental, practical, emotional and empowering grasp on the realities that are faced.

Paul Isaacs 2017


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Meeting Up With The King’s

 

This week I had the pleasure of meeting up with the King’s they are family that live in the north of England in the Wakefield. Sharon and Richard have three children on the autism spectrum Rosie who is diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome, Lenny with Classic autism and Daisy with Kabuki Syndrome and Classic autism.

Staying with the family was very interesting and reflective on my part, as all the family showed deep love and care for each other being honest about the difficulties and  balanced about them showing deep care and empowerment for each other.

Their kindness and humility was reflected in the hospitality shown to me and the others we met on our travels to the park during my visit it is sometimes the little things that matter as much as the big ones. I look forward to meeting them again.

Paul Isaacs  2016