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Autism from the inside


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Paul Isaacs: Living Through the Haze 2nd Edition Review By Dr. Manuel Casanova 

 

Paul Isaacs’ book, “Living Through the Haze”, has been published (second edition). The book has new content, a new introduction and an afterword that I wrote. Paul was diagnosed as autistic in 2010. As a child Paul was considered to be a “naughty child” with no prospects for a future. At present Paul is a lecturer, trainer and consultant who promotes autism awareness throughout the UK. In the following paragraphs I provide the afterword that I wrote for “Living Through the Haze”:

Many times during his life Paul felt confused and detached from his surroundings. His attention could only focus on one aspect of his sensory experience. He lived his life as if wearing blinders, and as such, he could not react adequately to what people asked of him at home, at school or at work. His perceptual style made him seem odd to his peers. Parents, teachers and peers objectivised and bullied him.  In the end the reader can only wonder, how did Paul survive?

For many autistic individuals the environment overwhelms their nervous system with information.  Seeing a face is like looking at the sun. Blinking, when looking at the sun, is a response aimed at avoiding damage to your eyes by allowing only a sliver of sunrays to hit your retina. In autistic individuals, allowing only a sliver of available information into your brain is meant to protect it from overstimulation. Overall, autistic individuals can’t see the forest for the trees and it is easy for them to become thoroughly engrossed in the details of a particular situation but miss the larger picture.

Paul grew up displaying many of the classical symptoms of autism. Unfortunately, as is the case for many autistic individuals, his diagnosis came late in life.  Still, he prospered and found fulfillment in being a speaker, counselor and in helping others like him. In this book Paul publicizes his own plight with some of the darker aspects of autism. Through no fault of his own Paul was misunderstood and relentlessly bullied by even those who were supposed to protect him.  The psychological and physical aggression that he suffered is at the crux of a mixed mood disorder that at times has greatly handicapped him.

So we can ask again, how did Paul survive? In a longitudinal study sponsored by the NIMH on so-called recovered autism, it seems that the most salient commonality for those that “recovered” was caring parents who were quick to act on behalf of their children.  Paul in this regard was blessed with caring supportive parents and grandparents. He also found solace and purpose in a special education camp outside of school, which he called the “Autism Base”. There he found others like him living within a spectrum of severities. More importantly, within the Autism Base he found comradely and a social sense of togetherness.

Paul has not forgotten the painful experiences of the past but has learned from them.  Indeed, the excuses provided by the teachers who failed him are indelibly marked in his memory. He has a keen power for introspection.  His ability to self-reflect is one of the reasons why I believe that there is undue emphasis in the Theory of Mind conceptualization of autism. Paul was always keenly aware of his mental state and on occasion provides privileged access to the mental state of his parents.

This is a must read book for parents with autistic kids, especially if they are attending mainstream schools. The book is also a valuable aid to teachers. It portrays in a no holds barred way the effects of intimidation and the behavioral manifestations of bullying. Finally, Paul provides many constructive comments and guidelines as to how to improve the school system and teaches by example the positives of a supportive role by parents.

Source: Paul Isaacs: Living Through the Haze

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Living Through The Haze: 2nd Edition

living-through-the-haze-2nd-edition-paperback-image

When I wrote Living Through Haze in 2012 it was a journey of finding out why I ticked the way I did and what that meant to me it was year in the making and I thankful for it being published to help other son the spectrum and professionals.

I was also glad that I got a foreword by Dr. Michael Layton the psychiatrist who diagnosed me in 2010 with keen introspection he is in many ways the opening of the book a precursor to the journey.

Now in 2016 I feel I have gained a lot of new worldly experiences and wanted to update part of my book which I felt needed to be. With the kind help of Tracy Kilner who is on the autism spectrum she assisted in the editing process with multicaulis attention to grammar, punctuation and  sentence formation.

Image result for Dr, Manuel Casanova

The next was an Afterword by Dr. Manuel Casanova who reviewed the 1st Edition of my book  he clearly illustrates what can learned from a person’s experiences and how that can be a foundation for the future, he also in no holds barred fashion clearly demonstrates the emotional  and mental health difficulties that have happened due to circumstances difficulties during my life.

Image result for James Billett Irlen

The next person is James Billett he diagnosed me in 2012 with visual perceptual disorders and gives a formal introduction to the book using statistics and reflecting on what can be learned from the reading this book.

Other elements included additional chapters and the expansion of the “autism fruit salad” section of my book.

Image result for donna williams

The final person who I would like thank in the process of this book is Donna Williams (Polly Samuel) as you know I have written many blogs, articles and presentations in conjunction with her extensive work in the field of autism. I would not know anything about he mechanics of my autism with her kindly help during the early 2010s. I would not be able to speaker in such away about my autism or autism in general without help. I value her professional input, caring nature and friendship.

My family and friends have always been there during times of need and I value and cherish their company and being the rocks that they are.

LIVING THROUGH THE HAZE 2ND EDITION PAPERBACK 

LIVING THROUGH THE HAZE 2nd E-BOOK 

Paul Isaacs 2016


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Over Generalisations In Autism

20160730_114554When people think of autism? One may need to consider this that is has never been a singular thing. In my previous blogs I have mentioned people like Donna Williams and Manuel Casanova who in their own unique style content has indicated through different observations and experiences that autism is not a generic, unmovable or flat presentation and that the components are different between person to person. That in turn means that different sources of help, aid and empowerment would be needed. It is very individualised.

Generalisations? Too Easy To Digest?

Generalisations are easy to digest I suppose they create a bubble in which the person has these sets of “traits” and one goes from there,  to point out the massive differentiation in autism it is surely more than healthy and beneficial? Also leading  finding why and how the person in question could be helped and empowered.

The Issues Around Autism “Culture”

“Autism” is not a culture that (to me) doesn’t make sense at all fitting into one individual into   culture means surely you are treading into many further degrees of separation which for me is very uncomfortable to consider or even acknowledge as something I would want to do or pursue as a goal.

To over invest in a label  means you are seeing your self as a single thing  and one definable thing and not seeing that like all human beings ALL people have different interacting personality types, environments, experiences, thoughts and feelings.

Something I strive for seeing the validity of being rather than over defining. This relates very much to over generalisations of “us” and “we” do this and “us” and “we” don’t do that if you step back think about this scenario and ethos is that (as the bigger picture) over time helpful?

Conclusion

The “autism world” has many hidden voices and experiences that people need to hear acknowledge and affirm reality for them – I once wrote in a previous blog that it is about listening to ALL people’s views whether they are parent, professional, person on spectrum or person off the spectrum.

Breaking down barriers of generalisations will lead to hopefully an fuller open dialogue in which we CAN learn and acknowledge from others with out man-made barriers which have been created in the “autism world.”

Paul Isaacs 2016

 


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“Neurotypical” – Is the Word Useful? And/or Meaningful?

“Exhibiting the qualities, traits, or characteristics that identify a kind, class, group, or category”IMAG0110

The Use Of The Word

The word itself doesn’t make sense – being used to describe “others” (people who aren’t on the spectrum) society is a mixture of different sorts of people and rather than lumping people into one “group” (neurotypical society, neurotypicals, NTS) wouldn’t it be best to say people who don’t have autism? People who aren’t on spectrum?

It has also been used as word to “attack” people by some people on the autism spectrum who don’t have autism which surely is reverse prejudice?

Two wrongs certainly don’t make a right in this case.

People Who Aren’t On The Spectrum – Aren’t All The Same (Because No One Is)

You can’t define other (in this context people who aren’t on the autism spectrum) by a set of standards that you have created based on assumption that they must all be like that, that is stereotyping, generalising and over-simplifying. If you treat the set of people by the same standards you expect them to treat you in this case that doesn’t apply because of the contradiction.

If it was reversed and all people on the spectrum were thought to be the same and that was projected people I’m sure people from many different quarters would have something to say – the same applies here. Humans are unique and worthy regardless of having a disability or not. Everyone is equal.

Being Balanced

Two people spring to mind who also question many aspects of the autism word – I have written many blogs about sense of togetherness and all views being taken into account in balanced and objective manner.

Dr Casanova

Dr Manuel Casanova has written many thought provoking and reflective blogs on this subject about representation. I consider Dr Casanova a realist with very firm and empathic with genuine heartfelt intentions and questions with regards to this subject.

THE NEURODIVERSITY MOVEMENT

Donna Williams 2011

Donna Williams has also written highly reflective blogs with regards to the this subject. She has too shares the same qualities with a firm realistic approach, empathic genuine and heartfelt in her words and intentions. I consider their sage advice forward thinking in the context of the autism “world”.

NTs’… When a Word Becomes ‘Loaded’ and Why I Don’t do Bigotry

People Are People 

I like people on the basis of being people it doesn’t matter who they are or were they come from I like them for their personalities not because of anything other – human beings are all unique and that means we are all equal in the world.

Paul Isaacs 2015


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Egalitarianism & Equalism – Is That The Way Forward For Autism?

Egalitarian doctrines maintain that all humans are equal in fundamental worth or social status”

Cambian Event 2014 12Everyone Is Precious & Equal  

In the context of the autism world (and my outlook in general) this is where I stand equality is for everyone, everybody who is in this world – I look at both sides of the the coin and take into account peoples realities (that makes me neutral/moderate/in the middle) that means that you look in a more three dimensional perspective of peoples diverse realities you cannot speak for all but one can learn from EACH OTHER through listening, experiencing and connecting. That is what is needed in this world kindness and empathy and accepting other people’s views.

That means the inclusion of 

  • Parents/Carers/Guardians
  • All Experiences On The Spectrum (The Whole Spectrum)
  • Professionals In The Field Of Autism (Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Neurologists, Biologists etc)
  • Social Support Services
  • Educational Services
  • Housing Services
  • And Many More

Militancy & Extremism & Is Not Equality 

No it isn’t is is quite the reverse it subjects people, suppresses them into a forced mode of thought and/or perception this means that voices potentially get lost in the process making people feel if they don’t go along with this – they are out of the “club”, lonely or worse. All views are of equal valor in the context. They should not violent, immature of disrespectful to someones character – all views even in disagreement can be acknowledged and politely disagreed with. This is why I am not a “culturist” or an “curist” but I believe in a balanced manner both sides have the right to their views it is in the way that they’re expressed and what is behind them.

DONNA WILLIAMS BLOG – AUTISM POLITICS

MANUEL CASANOVA – NEURODIVERSITY

Person with Autism 

I also try my best to live with the good cards I was given not over-investing in my autism being the defining factor of my being (but having a healthy acknowledgment of it that it’s there) but also thinking about other qualities I have such as being a writer, poet and artist – I do have disability, I do have autism and I have a “mild” learning disability that is true but I am a human being first and foremost. And for someone to be seen as person equal to everyone else is a basic human right for anyone.

Social Equality – It’s for Everyone 

Accepting experiences is through the understanding that everybody was born equal, no labels, no social status, no preconceptions just born a little person preparing to grow-up on what ever path is grown from development, environment and/or otherwise everybody has the right to have a roof over their head, three meals a day, a wage/payment which can support themselves and their families, a benefit system that cares for the disabled and people with mental illnesses, a government that looks out for all it’s people, wars quenched not and man made barriers be fallen so every person knows the commonality of being human is that everybody is all different and let people be novices to other peoples experiences so another person gains anew. People all deserve the right to be equal.

Paul Isaacs 2014


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Neurodiversity – Sometimes Things Have To Be Questioned

Dr Casanova

Dr Casanova

I have a lot of respect for Dr Manuel Casanova and this a very revealing blog about the subject of neurodiversity and what it means – it is my opinion that no one person can “represent” autism just because they themselves are on the autism spectrum.

I Can Only Speak About My Reality With Autism

I make professional and moral judgement to say this is my profile and that is the ONLY place it is coming from (I can’t speak for others on the spectrum) – I say “I” and “me” not “us” and “we” in speeches (again I cannot speak for everyone on the spectrum that doesn’t make sense).

I don’t believe autism is a “culture” either (I am apart of the human race) and I think we need think about what is projected and who is losing out? Is it people who don’t tow the line, fit the “stereotypes” are not seen as good advocates because of their “functioning”. I wonder? I know we all have a story to tell? But is it right for someone to tell their story on everyone else’s behalf?

Empowerment & Acknowledgment Of Multiple Realities Of Autism 

Autism is a “Fruit Salad” it is not one thing, it isn’t one syndrome and it affects people in different ways so what Manuel is advocating is that the more realities we acknowledge and listen to the more understanding we have – their should be no single representation because the voices get lost, realities can form into assumptions and they are both dangerous and can make people feel isolated and alone in their struggles.

Autism As As “Fruit Salad” & Breaking Down “Stereotypes”

Fruit Salad Analogy Copyright D.Williams

Fruit Salad Analogy Copyright D.Williams

As Donna Williams analogy points out “Autism” is not “one thing” it is a clustering of different pieces that create the person’s on unique profile and presentation that means that logically no one person is the same on the autism spectrum, therefore realities within autism are different and people on the spectrum are not all the same, nor do they have same needs, desires or aspirations. I will take that one step further and say if someone got up on stage and talked about “non-autistic syndrome”  and made the assumption every one with this syndrome is the same we would be in big trouble.

The Whole Spectrum & Personhood 

I am for one agree and for empowerment, inclusion, diversity but that must be inclusive to the whole spectrum of “Fruit Salads” and the realities within them and seeing someone’s personhood is very empowering.

People With Classic Autism and/or Learning Disabilities & People Who Are Functionally Non-Verbal (Who Are Empowered By Different Forms Of Expressing Words 

Looking at the whole spectrum means looking at different profiles and presentations and the firm empowering inclusion of people with classic autism and/or learning disabilities and people who are functionally non-verbal. Sometimes I worry that people with these diagnosis’ (who are considered to have an “exotic” or “atypical” presentation) and profiles don’t get recognition or heard. They are competent folk who need support too and their realities should be explored and recognised. They deserve to have voice.

Parents Views

Parent’s views are very important too and explorations of different ways to empower, support and help their children is also needed.

Autism “Politics” 

I stay neutral and balanced like I point towards being a moderate in my views on autism accepting the diverse, different realities and people’s stories and what their own personal experiences are (be that a parent, guardian, person on the spectrum etc) all are valid.

I have said before that I’m not a “curist” and I’m not an “ableist” but a “neutral” because I believe everyone has a story to tell without going to unhealthy extremes if we listened with our hearts we would learn about each others experiences.

Other Blogs On The Subject

Please Include Everyone On The Autism Spectrum, Listening Is Positive & No One Person Can Speak For Everyone On the Autism Spectrum

Listening & Hearing Everyone’s Views In The Autism”World”

Paul Isaacs 2015


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Strategies For The “Pieces” of My Autism Using Donna Williams’ Fruit Salad Analogy

Fruit Salad Analogy Copyright D.Williams

Fruit Salad Analogy Copyright D.Williams

Note – That this is from a personal perspective of my profile and what makes up “my autism”

Here are all the pieces of my Autism broken down into bits and chucks with a personal perspective on each bit and personal strategies that have helped me over the years.

Expressive Agnosias

Alexithymia

This is an issue with processing one’s own emotions it affects about 85 percent of people on the autism spectrum and is experienced on different levels depending on how one is affected and what moods create the issue.

Personal Perspective

For me emotions come outside in and not inside out they are an invasion a wave of energy that is uncontrollable, invisible and scary – negative emotions take longer to process and configure as well – for example it took my 3 whole years to process (emotionally) that I was being bullied at work everybody else knew I didn’t. I a wave of energy hit me that night as I cried uncontrollably with the realisation of what happened again it took 3 years. As a teenager I would tense my face up and self-harm in the form of knuckling my cheeks, slapping my legs and hitting my arms in confusion and disconnect.

Strategies

  • Paul what are the origins of your feelings (helping me find a starting point)
  • Paul are these feelings environmental (situational) or is this not
  • Use objects of reference and gestural language and representation to explain

Receptive/Expressive Language & Movement Issues (Speech & Communication)

Aphasia

There are many different forms of aphasia which affect both expressive and receptive communication

Personal Perspective 

Sounds and language intermingled and became indisputable I would react with glee and find these “sounds” that people made and tilt my head in wonderment, perplexed and even intrigued by these “sounds” this was at pre-school – event now receptive language is difficult for me (words process back into sounds meaning deafness)

Strategies

  • Clipped telegraphic language
  • Tone and overt melody
  • Gestural language – creating movements which connect with the words like a play
  • Allowing processing time

Speech Delay

BewdjULCYAAzv0H Personal Perspective

Swirling sounds and words in my head – I had problems with expressive speech for about the first five years I had no functional language in head for many years – I would have moments of clarity, moments of language which slowly progressed but no one saw because of my external behaviours I had limited words within my head which progressed – no one should be written off if they don’t have expressive speech, I heard things in the playground and slowly processed them and because of how I appeared it looked like I didn’t hear/understand.

Strategies 

  • Word and sound play
  • Movement
  • Not presumed incompetence

Language Delay 

Personal Perspective

At around the ages of 7/8 years old I gained functional expressive speech of (from a developmental perspective a 3 year old) – with the receptive and expressive language disconnect I had issues with understanding to express and equally expressing to understand. This lead to confusion with not only myself but others around me Speech Apraxia (Verbal Dyspraxia) also compacted the issue (coordination of  the mouth and tongue and jaw muscles to extract speech) this was prevalent until late infancy in my CAMHS  (Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services) notes speech production was at times heard to understand.

Strategies 

  • Clipped Telegraphic Language
  • Gestural language (both from myself and speaker)
  • Word, Sentence & Language play (use of syntax, meaning, word production, sentence connections)
  • Contextualisation of words

Selective Mutism – (once functional speech was acquired)

During late infancy and early teenage-hood I had bouts of mutism (having the ability to speak but because of anxiety would not) this included – people who I sensed were non genuine, too much expressive language from speaker (meaning deafness) so unable to give an answer that was contextually correct.

Strategies

  • Understanding the origins of the mutism (social anxiety, exposure anxiety, OCD obsessive compulsive disorder, language processing disorder, social phobia etc)
  • Boosting self-confidence – such as in my cases drawings and exercise
  • Understanding the receptive and expressive communication profile

Tic Disorder  & Globus Pharyngis – 8 Years old – was called a “Nervous Throat”

Personal Perspective

In mid to late infancy I had what was termed a nervous throat this was to do with the “feeling” or an obstruction in my throat causing me to in a tic-like fashion make a loud “Hum!” and “ahem!” sound.

Strategies

  • What are the places of anxiety in one’s life that has caused this
  • Making me aware of when I was doing this sound

Echophenomena

Personal Perspective

Sounds, patterns, themes, feeling, movement and experiencing this world, people and place. I don’t use elaborate constructions but do and sense in order to perceive, understand an process I don’t live in a world of literalism nor logic as basis of “concrete” understanding – even now that form of and basis of understanding things, people, environments etc.

Strategies

  • Movies (focusing on the sounds, movements and expressions)
  • Music (tone, melody and rhyming)
  • Observing surroundings and contextualisation

Visual Agnosias

 Personal Experience 

I see faces (face blindness), bodies and visual environment as fragmented (object blindness) which also meant I could not see body language or facial expression , flat tursh and without depth or meaning (meaning blindness) not understanding self and other of what is around me for example it took me until 16 years old to understand that when I looked in the mirror firstly I was looking at myself (although I still get a level of disconnect) and that what “seems to be in front of me” is in reality behind me. My visual perceptual systems have layered effect on what I see and interpret.

Strategies 

  • Sculpting objects in my space this would including licking, sniffing, mouthing as a way to externalise the object making it real for me this help me map out my space
  • Preference for having no shoes of socks on in my youth and around the house (patterning movements)
  • Sculpting faces remembering and connecting with someone by touching their face (I have only done that to 7 people in my lifetime to date)
  • Having objects on display not “hidden” because I don’t have visual memory so placement is important
  • Recognising people by sensing their patterns of movement and their voice
  • Tinted lenses help with sensory integration, moving in visual space, depth perception, body language, posture and confidence

Auditory Agnosias/Aphasia

Personal Perspective

Hearing sounds environmental with no on origin (auditory agnosias) hearing words as “sounds” (verbal auditory agnosia/receptive aphasia) missing tone, sarcasm, idioms not because of literalism but because of how much language I can process before I “hear” nothing.

Strategies 

  • Telegraphic language and clipped words for the origins of environmental sounds (auditory agnosias)
  • Telegraphic and gestural language – being overt, pantomime like in expression, tone and melody
  • Music, rhythmic beats and movement help my brain “work”

Body Disconnection

Personal Perspective

Not being connected to my body means that pain is not recognised as well as a sense of my own body its inter-connectivity and its connection (as a whole form) around the world around me, I appeared odd to bouts of trauma having a tooth almost knocked out (an elbow to the mouth) was me with indifference to pain but shock and sadness at the blood (this element coming out of me) and a dislocated arm was met with anger and confusion because of the lack of movement not the pain. During times of mental illness I self-harmed both my arms not “knowing when to stop”  and as a child I didn’t have knowledge of my fingers (my limbs also rolled into one another as if they didn’t exist).

Strategies

  • Pressure points around my body – bracelets on wrists, tight shoes, belt, jacket and/or shirt and long hair tied back (adding pressure getting a sense of my head)
  • As a young child smearing paint, moulding play dough and sifting sand (to get a sense of my “foreign fingers”)
  • Messy play as a child
  • Dental appointments (for me this is form of sensory integration and very relaxing) 🙂

Dissociative Disorders – Recognised  in 2012/Revised 2014

Personal Perspective

In late infancy I started to dissociate as coping mechanism during these years and for many after taking myself away from both the situation and environment, persistent bullying during my educational and work years didn’t help the issue and I “created” personas (with strong reactionary personality profiles) to deal with this. I developed PTSD some years ago reliving an abusive incident that happened in my mid teenager years.

Strategies 

  • Understanding that dissociation is on a spectrum from daydreaming to higher frequencies and detachment of you the person and/or the environment you are in.
  • Therapy that includes mapping memory, incidents, personas and coping mechanisms
  • Understanding trigger responses
  • Personal origins of dissociation

Mental Health

Personal Perspective 

I started to develop OCD in my early teenager years this was persistent and would resulted in hand washing, placement moving and plug and switch checking, door-slamming and checking. Exposure anxiety was to do with an involuntary response to direct exposure interaction this would lead me to run away literally (or in my mind). Like many people on the spectrum I advocate the personhood first in the late 2000s I developed two distinct personality disorders (extreme versions of my “normalised” personality traits.

Strategies

  • Origins of OCD – in my case this was fear of the house being burned down, burglary,  germs and confirmation, and invasive illness that would lead to pain and/or death
  • Indirect confrontation for exposure anxiety talking away from me, talking about me but allowing me to hear it and integrate it without being in the mix
  • Knowing personality its traits and extremes (disordered versions of “normalised” versions/traits)

Learning Difficulties

Personal Perspective

Words swilling in my head I found them hard to process and strand together as words formed in my head over time I found it hard to translate them onto the page, the same with numbers which don’t swill in my head I found it hard to grasp numbers their meaning and their interpretation and their overall function.

Strategies

  • Clipped sentences – one stage at a time
  • Pens with extra grip (fine motor movements)
  • Alternate ways of writing
  • Function and context of what number “mean”

Auto-Immune

Candida Albicans

Personal Perspective

Many foods would make me fill ill both in body and mind causing me to have brain fog, lack concentration and further hinder my processing and integration of information from my surroundings, language and sounds.

Strategies

  • Understand foods, their content and what ingredients they have in them
  • Piecing  together what foods are making you ill, unwell and have brain fog
  • Piecing together what foods you can have that don’t make you ill

Other

Personal Perspective

This can be related to anxiety it is the slow stripping of enamel making them look “smooth” and/or “chipped” in appearance I have this with many teeth on one side of mouth

Strategies

  • For me regular checks at the dentist and a gum guard at night has helped with issue
Dr Casanova

      Dr Casanova

Genetics – Developmental Agnosias & Minicolumns

Some agnosias, sensory hypersensitivity, sensory integration disorders and many other conditions and syndrome can be passed down and can be seen as congenital in nature how the brain has grown with genetic encoding  – Neurologist  Dr Manuel Casanova calls this Minicolumns please take a look at this blog about his research and findings

AUTISM & MINICOLUMNS

PERSONAL WEBSITE

PERSONAL BLOG SITE

Donna Williams 2011

  Donna Williams

Donna Williams – Autism as a “Fruit Salad”

Donna is quite correct in letting the world know that autism is a “clustering” of different conditions (both neurological and metabolic systems), syndromes, personhood and personality extremes, environment, mental health and learning styles. No one person with autism is the same and that means there is a high level of diversity to their which is good.

WHAT IS AUTISM? BLOG

AUTISM & ASPERGERS “FRUIT SALADS”

PERSONAL WEBSITE

Premature 1

                         Me Premature

Brain Injury Relates To My Autism Profile

Having brain injury at both has also had an impact on my autism presentation I was born premature and through placental abruption, cerebral hypoxia, silent stroke and damage the left hemisphere of the brain (which is related to aphasia, language processing, visual agnosias, simultagnosia, apraxias and  visual spatial functioning)

HYPOXIA & BRAIN INJURY 

 I would say that these added factors has made my autism “Fruit Salad” more complex in nature and presentation – there are clearly other members of my are on the on the autism spectrum who have been diagnosed but their profiles are very different from mine in terms of presentation the mechanics.

 Having an Autie Profile

 Having an Autie profile in terms of presentation means I live in world (from a processing perspective) that is less literal, less logical and I use my sensory systems to work out the world I live in and I think it is important to know the mechanical differences between Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome and the people in between profiles “Aspinauts”. Every profile is unique in presentation so interventions, learning and communications will have to be person centred.

 Personhood First? Why?

For all what is said and done I want to be known for my personhood first my autism comes along with me wherever I go, however it doesn’t define my being, it doesn’t make me what I am in totality (it affects how I perceive and processing the world). I love art, poetry, music, movies, fashion, drawing, being silly, bad jokes, dogs and want to know for those things first.

I hope this helps others. 🙂

Paul Isaacs Adult with Autism 2014