Paul Isaacs' Blog

Autism from the inside


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Autism -The Three Stages of Empowerment

Autism “Fruit Salads”(© Donna Williams 1995/2005/2014)

This is bottom to top analogy which implements all aspects of what could be in a person’s “autism fruit salad” to start off with the foundation is to understand the mechanics of what is within a person’s “autisms” (rather than autism). By looking at this we can separate it into these aspects.

  • Communication profile
  • Social-emotional profile
  • Emotional processing profile
  • Sensory Integration profile
  • Sensory Perceptual profile
  • Receptive Language profile
  • Expressive Language profile
  • Motor-coordination profile
  • Dietary profile
  • Auto-immune disorders profile
  • Learning styles profile
  • Personality types profile
  • Identity profile
  • Co-conditions profile

Interventions

These will be tailored to the specific needs of person’s profile/profiles looking holistically as well as professional for empowerment, guidance, social support, emotional support and/or any aspect of the person “autisms” that is within the mix. For example you could have someone who has exposure anxiety and dislikes direct confrontation and prefers an indirectly confrontational approach, is profoundly meaning deaf and aphasic. Think how you would build up that person’s profile and empower them?

An example

  • Gestural language
  • Aiding Mentalising by building up meaning and association
  • Being a follower not a leader or an expectant doer
  • Leave them wanting more and giving positive affirmations

Solutions

They will come in many forms as they marriage of each step relies on the one previous with regards to the “final step” this will be looking at what is working, aiding and empowering the person, their families, guardians etc. This could be put in an report or functional document for educational and professional services to have or it could be used as an information pack for friends and family the choice is yours.

Remember autism is not ONE THING it is a CLUSTERING of pre-existing conditions within one PERSON and that is the thing to realise that one person’s reality does not mean that is representational of all because that would mean a lot voices and realities would be left unheard it is time to change the landscape and starts with being open minded.

Paul Isaacs 2017


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To Polly – A Friend – Thank You

 

To Polly A Friend

Words cannot plunder

The source of your wonder

A light in the bleak dark

Words that make their mark

A kindly soul with the gift to give

A balanced example of how to live

A humbling experience your facts and humour

Your words, pictures and  legacy will forever nearer and sooner

Empowerment 

What can I say? I often have wondered how to put into words how I feel about the impact that Polly has made on my life, the words, the support, the chuckles over our skype chats the personal and professional guidance that was given in the blink of an eye. She has helped broaden my professional career, empowered me to find myself and ultimately has given me invaluable tools.

Setting Examples 

The kindness and concern the building blocks shown by words and example and the insatiable zest for life and to “just be” in your own skin, to have fun, to be serious, to be balanced, to be caring, to be selfless, to be you, to understand me and other, to be giving and to be caring, to not put yourselves above and to finally find yourself and pave your own journey so you may have the tools to experience life anew. That is what I think when I will remember Polly a shining example of balance, breaking of barriers, retaining self, not selling out and creating her own path.

Connecting 

I meet Polly briefly in 2009 at a conference and connected with her on social media a few years later. I value her friendship because she showed me that relationships can be built on safe, secure and balanced foundations and to expect anything less is the time to move on and pave something new. I am fully aware people knew Polly far more than I did in terms of length of time and so forth. I would like to say that the impact she made on me and her continued friendship online put faith and self-belief back into a realistic and doable perspective.

I thank you Polly for giving me the tools to empower, for giving me hope, laughs, reality and solutions and just being you.

Nobody Nowhere – Paper Owl Films 

Paul Isaacs 2017

 


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Autism As A Fruit Salad By Donna Williams Book Review

AVAILABLE AS $5 E-BOOK

From 1995-2011 I worked with over 1000 people diagnosed on the autism spectrum. In order to best address the needs of children and adults with autism I needed to fathom what was being called or presumed ‘their autism’ and work out the underlying mechanics of each of these things.

The Autism As A Fruit Salad is a 37 page, interactive, comprehensive alphabetical 101.  The E-book form comes complete with hyperlinks on the vast collection of over 200 conditions that in combinations can collectively present as ‘autism’ or ‘parts of one’s autism’ (The signed paperback format doesn’t have the hyperlinks). In either format, Autism As A Fruit Salad should equip those living with and working with autism to move beyond the static 2D model of autism to a dynamic 3D model that goes beyond one-size-fits-all-approaches and gives you tools to tailor approaches to each person.

WHO IS IT FOR?

* Anyone wanting to understand what is involved any particular person’s ‘autism fruit salad’
* Parents, case managers, behaviour intervention staff, troubleshooters and people with autism looking to gain a clearer sense of what it actually presenting as ‘the autism

BOOK REVIEW

A comprehensive and rounded view of what “autism” is Donna Williams has opened up many people’s perspectives with her lectures, blogs and books around the subject of “autism” in many ways this is a sister book/sequel to her handbooks Autism: An Inside Out Approach (1996) & The Jumbled Jigsaw (2005).

It is structured in an easy read listed fashion with hyperlinks for each piece it also supplies hints and tips for people who want to find out their “pieces” too, the E-book edition supplies the reader with hyperlinks giving a personal and interactive style to the reader making accessible guideposts.

Donna supplies deep introspection as always in her knowledge and the essence of giving something back in many ways she build up a plethora of experience both personal, educational and practical in her years as a consultant this book  condenses it for the reader making it accessible for young and old, novice and veteran I highly recommend this book.

Paul Isaacs 2016

 


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Living Through The Haze: 2nd Edition

living-through-the-haze-2nd-edition-paperback-image

When I wrote Living Through Haze in 2012 it was a journey of finding out why I ticked the way I did and what that meant to me it was year in the making and I thankful for it being published to help other son the spectrum and professionals.

I was also glad that I got a foreword by Dr. Michael Layton the psychiatrist who diagnosed me in 2010 with keen introspection he is in many ways the opening of the book a precursor to the journey.

Now in 2016 I feel I have gained a lot of new worldly experiences and wanted to update part of my book which I felt needed to be. With the kind help of Tracy Kilner who is on the autism spectrum she assisted in the editing process with multicaulis attention to grammar, punctuation and  sentence formation.

Image result for Dr, Manuel Casanova

The next was an Afterword by Dr. Manuel Casanova who reviewed the 1st Edition of my book  he clearly illustrates what can learned from a person’s experiences and how that can be a foundation for the future, he also in no holds barred fashion clearly demonstrates the emotional  and mental health difficulties that have happened due to circumstances difficulties during my life.

Image result for James Billett Irlen

The next person is James Billett he diagnosed me in 2012 with visual perceptual disorders and gives a formal introduction to the book using statistics and reflecting on what can be learned from the reading this book.

Other elements included additional chapters and the expansion of the “autism fruit salad” section of my book.

Image result for donna williams

The final person who I would like thank in the process of this book is Donna Williams (Polly Samuel) as you know I have written many blogs, articles and presentations in conjunction with her extensive work in the field of autism. I would not know anything about he mechanics of my autism with her kindly help during the early 2010s. I would not be able to speaker in such away about my autism or autism in general without help. I value her professional input, caring nature and friendship.

My family and friends have always been there during times of need and I value and cherish their company and being the rocks that they are.

LIVING THROUGH THE HAZE 2ND EDITION PAPERBACK 

LIVING THROUGH THE HAZE 2nd E-BOOK 

Paul Isaacs 2016


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Hope is Universal. It’s for everybody with Paul Isaacs #isharehope Episode 107

Chris+WilliamsMany thanks to Chris Williams for conducting the interview with me to following the I Share Hope project please click here.

Paul was branded as a “naughty child” at school. He was classically autistic in his early years and gained functional speech around the age of 7 or 8 years old. He went through mainstream school with no additional help or recognition of his autism. Consequently, he did not achieve his academic or his social potential and had very low self-esteem.

After a string of unsuccessful jobs, Paul’s mental health suffered. He was referred to mental health services and misdiagnosed with “Asperger traits with a complex personality”, which did not satisfy. Paul was diagnosed by an experienced psychiatrist, who diagnosed him with High Functioning Autism at 24 years old.

paul-isaacs-i-share-hopePaul wanted to promote autism awareness and help others on the autism spectrum, in the hope that others would not have to suffer as he had. He became a speaker for an autism organisation and has not looked back! Presenting speeches, training and conducting consultancy, Paul is now a freelance speaker, trainer and consultant who continues to raise the profile of autism at every opportunity. Having done much research, he is keen to explain the differences between Asperger’s Syndrome & Autism using Autism Consultant Donna William’s (Polly Samuel’s) ‘Fruit Salad’ model.

Paul firmly believes in retaining the ASD acronym. He says there should not be a negative stigma around the word ‘disorder’. His message is that Autism is a complex mix of ability and disability and every person with autism (and all people) should be a valued member of society.

Paul in his spare time likes to meetup with friends, create art and write poetry which is both a creative and relaxing output for him.

Hope is Universal. It’s for everybody with Paul Isaacs #isharehope Episode 107

Summary: Paul’s answer to the five questions! Listen to the full conversation on the player above; also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Soundcloud.

Question 1: How do you define hope or what is your favorite quote about hope?

Paul Isaacs:

Hope to me is…you got a feeling then create that into action and then hopefully you can make way for the action. Hope is the building blocks of something that you want to change and it could be anything where you actually instill positivity or at least objectivity in someone and go from there. It’s giving someone a realistic framework.

Question 2: Who has shared the most hope with you?

Paul Isaacs:

I would say it’s my parents because they gave me positive foundations, they have given me a sense of real life, introduced me to real life. Not candy-coating it, not giving it any sort of gloss. This is real life. They make me feel that negativity is a normal part of life, failure is a normal part of life, losing is a normal part of life – it’s a part of life. Success is brilliant, but it’s also about learning from failure and understanding your weaknesses.

Question 3: How have you used hope to make it through a difficult time in your life?

Paul Isaacs:

The one thing that was difficult for me as a person looking in hindsight or in retrospect is the way in which the community didn’t understand my behavior or understood where those behaviors were coming from. One of the sad things for me was how my parents were treated. Within the community, a lot of assumptions were made about their parenting skills. I suppose at that point, that would probably be the time where my parents would have wanted someone to talk to about the difficulties. I would say, looking back in hindsight, it was so much to do with me, but it was more to do with the alienation for misunderstanding. I just think it was a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding that caused the initial alienation.

It was constant criticism which then of course hurts the parents and when I went for education, it was never really anything positive. Of course it’s understandable because I was in a mainstream school – this is a non-specialized environment. Again, I’m not bitter at the teachers. Actually, my first year of primary school, that’s five years old and one of the teachers said “I don’t know what to do with him.” She was completely lost, but of course she’d be completely lost. It’s almost if you hear that saying “victim of circumstance”, they weren’t necessarily bad people. It was just a circumstance that happened and then it rolled on from there really.

Question 4: How are you sharing hope today?

Paul Isaacs:

I have only been doing this job for about six years in terms of speeches and consultancy and I have never ever seen a community with absolutely really nasty politics, militancy, bullying. I mean I’ve seen it on social media. I mean someone doesn’t say it’s the status quo, being ganged upon, trolling. I’ve never seen anything like it. Another thing that concerns me is the glamorization. You shouldn’t glamorize anything. Glamorization is not objective. If one size fits all condition so you start saying all autistic people are this and that and the other, what you’re doing is sadly creating a set of stereotypes and in any other context, would stereotypes be acceptable? No.

So, what I’ve learned is don’t get sucked in by it, do what’s in your heart, don’t define yourself or autism that it’s a superpower, that you’re special. The thing that has kept me grounded – I was born a human being like you and like anyone else. I was born a human being so I don’t overinvest in my autism at all. When I go to work, I’m a human being, when I go out there, I’m a human being. I don’t glamorize and I equally don’t demonize the issues. You keep objective. What don’t you hear about in autism? There are people with autoimmune conditions, metabolic disorders, tissue connectivity disorders, and neuropathy, things that affect the body and have an effect on that person’s functioning. In other words, autism is an adjective – it’s not a definition. It’s a stacking of preexisting conditions and depending on the stacking – you can get a more refined stacking, you can get a more complex stacking, you can get a more intermediate stacking.

When I speak, I don’t want you to remember me. I don’t want the ego to take over. I just want people to remember what I said.

Question 5: How should I (the listener) begin to grow in hope or share hope today?

Paul Isaacs:

(1) Get to know people.
(2) Say hello – connect with people.

Listen to the interview with Chris Williams and I on Soundcloud 


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Over Generalisations In Autism

20160730_114554When people think of autism? One may need to consider this that is has never been a singular thing. In my previous blogs I have mentioned people like Donna Williams and Manuel Casanova who in their own unique style content has indicated through different observations and experiences that autism is not a generic, unmovable or flat presentation and that the components are different between person to person. That in turn means that different sources of help, aid and empowerment would be needed. It is very individualised.

Generalisations? Too Easy To Digest?

Generalisations are easy to digest I suppose they create a bubble in which the person has these sets of “traits” and one goes from there,  to point out the massive differentiation in autism it is surely more than healthy and beneficial? Also leading  finding why and how the person in question could be helped and empowered.

The Issues Around Autism “Culture”

“Autism” is not a culture that (to me) doesn’t make sense at all fitting into one individual into   culture means surely you are treading into many further degrees of separation which for me is very uncomfortable to consider or even acknowledge as something I would want to do or pursue as a goal.

To over invest in a label  means you are seeing your self as a single thing  and one definable thing and not seeing that like all human beings ALL people have different interacting personality types, environments, experiences, thoughts and feelings.

Something I strive for seeing the validity of being rather than over defining. This relates very much to over generalisations of “us” and “we” do this and “us” and “we” don’t do that if you step back think about this scenario and ethos is that (as the bigger picture) over time helpful?

Conclusion

The “autism world” has many hidden voices and experiences that people need to hear acknowledge and affirm reality for them – I once wrote in a previous blog that it is about listening to ALL people’s views whether they are parent, professional, person on spectrum or person off the spectrum.

Breaking down barriers of generalisations will lead to hopefully an fuller open dialogue in which we CAN learn and acknowledge from others with out man-made barriers which have been created in the “autism world.”

Paul Isaacs 2016

 


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Anxiety Disorders and Autism

Sound Asleep 2Autism And Anxiety? 

When one looks at “autism” and what is “autism” to say that anxiety is autism or autism is anxiety we do you mean by that? When we look at the clustering and overlapping issues that can make a human being anxious it is not exclusive to  autism that someone gets anxious, depressed, lonely, isolated, confused and at a loss. One’s reality should be taken as it is not as a false projection of what is should be.

Autism Doesn’t Have A Collective “Look”

This is why I get worried about the “autistic culture” movement stating what “is” and “isn’t” an “autistic reality” personally I would like to know what such a “reality” that is?

A Human Life? 

I certainly don not live an “autistic life”. I live a human life like everyone else on the planet these stereotypes are not only unhelpful but can cut-off people whom do not fit the status quo and if that is the case then that is just reverse bigotry.

What Is Behind The Behaviour? Is It More? 

When look at different aspects of anxiety based disorders one has to look at what they are in terms of presentation and if they overlap with something this could be for example certain personality types that are more driven by hyper-vigilance, obsessive-compulsive states or over-thinking/analysis.

CATASTROPHIZING
EXPOSURE ANXIETY
GENERALISED ANXIETY DISORDER
PANIC DISORDER
PHOBIAS
SEPARATION ANXIETY DISORDER
SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER
SOCIAL PHOBIA

TECHNOLOGY RELATED
GAMING ADDICTION
INTERNET ADDICTION DISORDER

OTHER
BEHAVIORAL ADDICTION
OCD
TOURETTES

(taken from “what is autism” donna william’/polly samuel’s blog page)

Lets look at facts not fads.

Paul Isaacs 2016