Paul Isaacs' Blog

Autism from the inside


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The “Autistic Identity” Phenomena

When I was diagnosed was autism in 2010 – I wasn’t aware of such an “identity” because to honest I was never in that “world” at all. I often wonder that despite the obvious difficulties I had during my development and environment the one thing that I had going for me was the simple “human-hood” which was conveyed by the my parents as a way of connecting with me.

I don’t consider this perception from my parents to be “unique”, “specialised” or “autistic-specific” in its intentions nor in its thinking at the time (although it could have well be seen as that on reflection).

I wasn’t born with a “label”

In many of my blogs I have spoken about the balance of being seen as “human”, “person” and “being” first and as I have been in this “world” for over five years. I have seen the firm importance of seeing people as “people”, by not defining their whole “soul”, “identity”, “being” by their label (or labels) nor having it being overtly defined for them so there is nothing else left.

“Labels” are an adjective not an overall definition

If everybody was to be defined by solely by a “label” wouldn’t it be restrictive, suffocating and narrowing your bandwidth of experiences, perceptions, thoughts and feelings?

Not towing line meant I could see “myself”

I am glad that I haven’t towed the line into the realms of stereotypes, group think, confirmation bias and all the militancy that goes with it. I am glad that my parents after I was diagnosed said that I am still “Paul” regardless. I am glad that I see the importance of seeing somone as a person first. I am glad that I have other interests that take up my time productively such as drawing, poetry, walks in the countryside and meeting up with friends.

People are people regardless

I am free to think and feel and have a more refined outlook that I am firstly and thankfully not being the centre of the universe, not the big answer all  to the questions, not speaking for “all” (because no one can) and have a egalitarian view that all people are of equal worth in this world no more and certainly no less.

Paul Isaacs 2016


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Autism, Diversity, The Dangers of Confirmation Bias & Autism Stereotypes

OVERVIEW

Confirmation Bias (also called confirmatory bias or myside bias)

Is the tendency of people to favor information that confirms their beliefs or hypotheses. People display this bias when they gather or remember information selectively, or when they interpret it in a biased way. The effect is stronger for emotionally charged issues and for deeply entrenched beliefs. People also tend to interpret ambiguous evidence as supporting their existing position. Biased search, interpretation and memory have been invoked to explain attitude polarization (when a disagreement becomes more extreme even though the different parties are exposed to the same evidence), belief perseverance (when beliefs persist after the evidence for them is shown to be false), the irrational primacy effect (a greater reliance on information encountered early in a series) and illusory correlation (when people falsely perceive an association between two events or situations).

EVERYBODY ON THE SPECTRUM IS DIFFERENT

I try to be opened minded about my Autism Profile and Personality I always point out that my personhood and Autism Fruit Salad are different things, I also point out I can’t speak for everyone on the spectrum (that is just impossible) but you can take certain things from what I and others  say of the spectrum.

INCLUDING THE WHOLE SPECTRUM & DIVERSITY

But even if someone had the same profile as me they would experience it differently from me.  I’m little cog on a big wheel and I will forever be learning about Autism because of the infinite presentations. profile, personalities, learning styles, trajectories and more.

No one person on the spectrum can speak for everyone but we can all help each other and that is by including all people on the spectrum as part of this process (yes I mean including the wonderful folks who are “seemingly” non-verbal and/or have learning a disability too!) 🙂

We all have stories to share. 🙂

Paul Isaacs 2014