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Autism from the inside


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Autism – Communication Beyond Speech? Sensing A System Before Interpretation With Sharon King

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Sharon King Speech is only the tip of the iceberg. There are many more ways to communicate

Paul Isaacs I have had many a good conversation about Sharon with regards to the “system” of “sensing” a world before “you”, “I”, “self”, “ego” etc. All human beings go through this developmental phase some people on the autism spectrum stay (to varying and differing degrees) in this framework. A world before cladding and concepts that build on to some degree intellectual understanding vs. introspection. If someone is still in this system they may well pick up on things/situations/emotions that are raw, they may see other functions for things rather than its “interpretive use”. 🙂

Paul Isaacs For example I would use the toilet an its flush system as a “toy” a place to contextualise, a place to feel and get “sensory/chemical highs”, I used shaving foam, litres of bubble bath to create patterns on the tiled surfaces for hours and hours, would/do take in the smells of nature around, its textures, its feeling. I have learnt that some people want to know how you are feeling this moment, at this time and in which order that doesn’t make their system wrong as it is system they are using just as much I am using mine so I think there are more degrees of humanity between people who are on and off the autism spectrum than people actually think. Boxes only muddy the issue. I also think there are many people off the spectrum who live in this system of sensing as well.

My World = One’s Own World. This is our first world. Before all of its later cladding and contortions, it is at first a place of sensing, beingness, the preconscious mind and unknown knowing. It is the place where we understand self in others and others in self through the skill of mergence.

The External World = The physical world known through our sensory experiences as processed through our bodies/brains and experienced as sensations, thoughts, emotions, connections. This is a directly hands on world where sensing and beingness may be relatively strongly intact.

The Interpretive World = the world of applied meaning to incoming experiences that progressively builds mental structures and frameworks that ultimately filter our direct sensed experiences of the physical world and develops conscious mind as the primary guide.

Ego World = Ego contortion that further clads, alters and filters the logical meaning we get from experiences of the physical world and further buries our original capacity for sensing and beingness. This can be indoctrination, culture, economics, identifications, rewards, honed addictions and competition for social, economic, cultural ‘currency’.

Donna Williams

Sharon King Sometimes I wonder if feelings are more real than the external reality as they are our first point of contact being ‘within’ and everything else is ‘without’ to be filtered through our senses.

Paul Isaacs I FEEL before I interpret so its almost like a translation with knowing on a conscious level translating. The main difference I see between auties and aspies is the the system of sensing (to some degree) is far more “there” this also is taking into account the information processing blockages that come with that.

For example my Father is very much OPPOSITE he build up frameworks first, concepts first and then feeling and reflections come second. Its in the end a differing system of understanding information around you.

Paul Isaacs 2018


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Asperger’s Syndrome & Classic Autism? Or Left Brain, Right Brain Autism “Fruit Salads”?

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The late Polly Samuel’s (Donna Williams) through her career had pointed out that firstly autism was adjective a describer of an experience rather than a definer of a person, she also pointed out through her books and blogs that “autism” is different for each person a clustering and multifaceted condition made of different conditions in both neurology  and biology  and contributing psycho-social factors, identity, mental health and environmental factors

Asperger’s Syndrome – Left Brain Autism

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When noting and observing people with Asperger’s Syndrome the part of the brain which is being used to compensate for a disconnect right is the left, people with Asperger’s Syndrome have a condition called social emotional agnosia this means that the person cannot perceive facial expression, body language and tone of voice. Even thought sensory issues may present themselves it would to do with modulation and integration rather than sensory perceptual issues that effect different areas of the brain, faceblindness (prosopagnosia) has a high co-morbidity as well as dyspraxia, alexithymia and literal perception of language. So other words people with AS have to intellectualise in order to compensate for the disconnect in the right.

Characteristics of Right Hemisphere Syndrome: 

– Left visual neglect – an individual may neglect words on the left side of the page or not realize that there are objects on the left side 
– Difficulty with facial recognition 
– Poor awareness of deficits 
– Poor self-monitoring 
– Impulsive behavior
– Poor initiation and motivation 
– Disorientation 
– Impaired attention/memory 
– Difficulty with organization and reasoning/problem – solving 
– Difficulty with social aspects of language (e.g., poor turn taking skills, providing too much information) 
– Difficulty understanding humor 
– Difficulty with word retrieval 

© By Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP Monday, July 25, 2011

Classic Autism – Right Brain Autism

When looking at “classic” autism one makes the impression that the person has (and wrongly) a “lower functioning” variant of AS, this could not be further from the truth people with classic  autism tend to to have receptive and expressive aphasia, verbal agnosia, speech/oral apraxia, and a higher rate of visual perceptual disorders such as simultagnosia and semantic agnosia. However introspection is in tact and just look at the poetry and art.

What if my brain injury or stroke is on the LEFT SIDE of my brain?

Injury to the left side of the brain may result in right-sided weakness and the following communication problems:

  • Receptive Language: Problems with understanding spoken or written language (listening and reading)
  • Expressive Language: Problems with expressing spoken or written language
  • Apraxia of Speech: Problems with programming and coordinating the motor movements for speaking
  • Dysarthria: Aspects of the speech system is impacted, which may result in slurred speech or a change in how your voice sounds
  • Computation: Problems with number and math skills
  • Analyzing: Problems with solving complex problems

© 2016 CONSTANT THERAPY

 

Right Brain Left Brain Autism Fruit Salads Image 2017

Differences between Aspergers and Autism ‘fruit salads’?

 In one of my books, The Jumbled Jigsaw, I presented a range of conditions commonly collectively occurring in those with autism and Aspergers. I was asked about the differences between an Aspergers (AS) ‘fruit salad’ and an Autism ‘fruit salad’As an autism consultant since 1996 and having worked with over 1000 people diagnosed on the autism spectrum there are areas that overlap, areas where similar can easily be mistaken for same, and areas that are commonly quite different. Some with AS can present far more autistically in childhood but function very successfully in adulthood. Some with Autism can have abilities and tendencies commonly found in Aspies and some will grow up to function far more successfully than they could in childhood but, nevertheless, when together with adults with Aspergers they each notice that the differences may commonly outweigh the similarities. Generally the more common differences are:

ASPERGERS
originally called ‘Autistic Psychopathy‘(now outdated)
commonly not diagnosed until mid, even late childhood.
lesser degrees of gut, immune, metabolic disorders, epilepsy and genetic anomalies impacting health systems
dyspraxia
mood, anxiety, compulsive disorders commonly onset from late childhood/teens/early adulthood as a result of bullying, secondary to social skills problems, secondary to progressive self isolation and lack of interpersonal challenge/involvement/occupation.
scotopic sensitivity/light sensitivity more than simultagnosia
most have social emotional agnosia & around 30% have faceblindness but usually not due to simultagnosia
literal but not meaning deaf
social communication impairments, sometimes selective mutism secondary to Avoidant Personality Disorder (AvPD)
sensory hypersensitivities more than sensory perceptual disorders
higher IQ scores due to less impaired visual-verbal processing
tendency toward Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), Schizoid rather than Schizotypal Personality Disorder and commonly Dependent Personality Disorder to some level.
higher tendency to AvPD rather than Exposure Anxiety
Alexithymia is common
ADHD common co-occurance but may be less marked than in those with autism.

AUTISM
Once known as Childhood Psychosis (now outdated)
generally there is always some diagnosis before age 3 (those born before 1980 were still usually diagnosed before age 3, although commonly with now outdated terms like ‘psychotic children’, ‘disturbed’, ‘mentally retarded’, ‘brain damaged’.
higher degrees and severity of gut, immune, metabolic disorders, epilepsy and genetic anomalies impacting health systems
mood, anxiety, compulsive disorders commonly observed since infancy
commonly amazing balance but commonly hypotonia
simultagnosia/meaning blindness rather than just scotopic sensitivity
verbal agnosia/meaning deafness
verbal communication impairments (aphasia, oral dyspraxia, verbal agnosia and associated echolalia and commonly secondary Selective Mutism)
lower IQ scores associated with higher severity of LD/Dyslexia/agnosias
tendency toward OCD/Tourettes, also higher rate of Schizotypal PD, DPD is common and tends to be more severe
higher tendency to Exposure Anxiety more than AvPD
higher tendency toward dissociative states (dissociation, derealisation, depersonalisation)
poetry by those with autism as opposed to AS commonly indicates those with autism can have high levels of introspection, insight
ADHD extremely common co-occurrence

Donna Williams, BA Hons, Dip Ed.
Author, artist, singer-songwriter, screenwriter.
Autism consultant and public speaker.
http://www.donnawilliams.net

Reflective Conclusion

It is simple people need to start looking at the functioning of the brain and how these different systems work for different people. This will in turn create advocacy which is not only meaningful and beneficial but character building and the correct information will give a broader foundation and palette to work from. I have autism (as opposed to AS) not because I am just “saying it” but because of what part of my brain effected.

What I am not saying (and never will say) is that I am speaking for all that would be disservice to many peoples realities. I am fully aware that this may challenge people me saying there are differences however looking at the neurology behind it and Polly’s observations I think there is room for healthy discussion.

Paul Isaacs 2017


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Colour Me With A Personality – Autism, Personality Types and “Disordered Extremes”

Malice Mizer Bara No Seidou 20004All human beings have personality types they are part of what makes “soul” along with are senses, information processing, reactions, life experiences, our friends, family members and cherished ones.

Many  a disagreement has been  made about me bringing up about personality types in the context of autism people have quite rightfully misunderstood my intentions or misunderstood the point of points I was trying to make so  lets look at this a bit more.

Of the 16 common personality traits identified by Oldham, all of us will have around 4-6 of these which tend to be our main personality traits, what collectively presents to others as ‘who we are’, our ‘self’, ‘personhood’, ‘identity’, ‘soul’. When these are not overdeveloped, they present merely as ‘traits’.  However, a particular personality trait or traits can become overdeveloped or stay at such a ‘volume’ that the person is functioning and presenting in the personality disorder range for that trait.  If they don’t break free of this they will progressively so identity with their own personality disorder they will take it as their ‘normal’.  Donna Williams (Polly Samuel)

NOT EVERYTHING IS THE “AUTISM” 

It is not restrictive or silly to point out that personality types do exist within human beings and in context of this segment with people with autism. Human being not only have 4 – 6 main personality types (no we are not machines we “encoding”) and you can also have what is called “secondaries” (mine I would say are conscientious and adventurous) that come along for the ride and they may well clash “internally” with the main traits themselves.

This is fluid and normal there is of course genetic factor to these traits maybe you can see “yourself” in another family member certain behaviours you can relate to and/or acknowledge, just like you can have personality clashes at work because you cannot relate to how some operates this is normal.

Some of the most common personality disorders in people in the autism spectrum include Obsessive-Compulsive, Schizoid and Schizotypal personality disorders and Avoidant and Dependent personality disorders.  Those with dissociative disorders may more commonly experience AvoidantSelf Defeating, Schizotypal, Borderline or Passive-Aggressive personality disorders.  Some personality disorders are commonly misdiagnosed as mood or anxiety disorders but unlike mood or anxiety disorders, personality disorders generally fail to respond significantly to medication.  Donna Williams (Polly Samuel) 

EGO- SYNTONIC & SEEING THE PERSONALITY DISORDER AS “THE AUTISM”

Ego- Syntonic Meaning Consistent with one’s sense of self, as opposed to ego-alien or dystonic (foreign to one’s sense of self). Ego-syntonic traits typify patients with personality disorders.

If a person or people around the person “sees” their “autism” as everything about them (including dictating their personality) then hypothetically if they acquired a personality disorder would they see it just apart of of their autism? Not needing to be changed? Or modified?

What if it is having an impact on the person but they just can not unpick or see that it is an issue and it is having an overall impact on their functioning? Their judgements? Their reactions? Their interpersonal skills? Their daily living skills? What then? This is food for thought from both a practical sense and how specialists can diagnose and treat those with personality disorders on the autism spectrum.

MY FOUR MAIN PERSONALITY TYPES WITH THE DISORDER VARIANTS

As you can see on the left I have my personality types and on the right I have the “disordered” variants of those types the explained in the middle is clear these “stresses” can cause the “normal” personality types to expand and “grow” the person themselves may well be observed by others as being “different” quick to temper, quick to cry for example their reactions are heightened to an extreme.

For more info on personality types look at www.ptypes.com

2007 PERSONALITY DISORDERS A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE

In 2007 I suffered a nervous breakdown my parents had noticed a change in “me” looking through my medical records two words sprung out at me “borderline” and “schziotypal”.

 These had an effect on these five main areas of functioning

  • Personal Judgement
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Personal Skills
  • Professional Skills
  • Daily Living Skills

Borderline Personality Disorder

It is characterized as:

A pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image and affects, as well as marked impulsivity, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the following:
  1. Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment. Note: Do not include suicidal or self-injuring behavior covered in Criterion 5
  2. A pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization and devaluation.
  3. Identity disturbance: markedly and persistently unstable self-image or sense of self.
  4. Impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging (e.g., promiscuous sex, eating disorders, binge eating, substance abuse,reckless driving). Note: Do not include suicidal or self-injuring behavior covered in Criterion 5
  5. Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, threats or self-injuring behavior such as cutting, interfering with the healing of scars (excoriation) or picking at oneself.
  6. Affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood (e.g., intense episodic dysphoria, irritability or anxiety usually lasting a few hours and only rarely more than a few days).
  7. Chronic feelings of emptiness
  8. Inappropriate anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g., frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical fights).
  9. Transient, stress-related paranoid ideation, delusions or severe dissociative symptoms

Schizotypal Personality Disorder

It is characterized as:

A disorder characterized by eccentric behaviour and anomalies of thinking and affect which resemble those seen in schizophrenia, though no definite and characteristic schizophrenic anomalies have occurred at any stage. There is no dominant or typical disturbance, but any of the following may be present:
  • Inappropriate or constricted affect (the individual appears cold and aloof);
  • Behaviour or appearance that is odd, eccentric, or peculiar;
  • Poor rapport with others and a tendency to social withdrawal;
  • Odd beliefs or magical thinking, influencing behaviour and inconsistent with subcultural norms;
  • Suspiciousness or paranoid ideas;
  • Obsessive ruminations without inner resistance, often with dysmorphophobic, sexual or aggressive contents;
  • Unusual perceptual experiences including somatosensory (bodily) or other illusions, depersonalization or derealization;
  • Vague, circumstantial, metaphorical, overelaborate, or stereotyped thinking, manifested by odd speech or in other ways, without gross incoherence;
  • Occasional transient quasi-psychotic episodes with intense illusions, auditory or other hallucinations, and delusion-like ideas, usually occurring without external provocation.

PEOPLE WITH AUTISM DO HAVE PERSONALITIES

These had a great impact on my overall functioning and it took over two years to bring the “volume” down on these aspects of my personality to levels of “normality”.

The first issue I want to address is within the autism community? I want to healthily challenge people who do not think (or acknowledged) that firstly personality types exist with people on the spectrum and secondly if they do what are they? And thirdly do you think you have ever had any personality disorders either yourself? Or in a loved on? If so what helped?

COLOUR MY PERSONALITY 

To acknowledge personality types is not constricting it is in fact the opposite the world is an can be a colourful place and differing personality types are part of the package for everybody.

Paul Isaacs 2016


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I am not a “Label” I am A Human Being First

Baby Pictures High ChairI don’t know about you but when I was born I was born a person, lets ditch the rhetorics and start listening to other peoples realities and opinions (regardless of were they come from) and accept that disagreement will come but everybody as their own things to say. Lets not be restricted by a “box” or the what is “in crowd” I thank the people who have said their realities with conviction, honesty, rawness and carrying on their lives as best they can be the example and don’t just claim it. I am not “autism” if doesn’t “define” my being it rides along life it not a “definition of my life”. I acknowledge those on  and off the spectrum who are honest about the realities lets start listening and going from there keep going even if you don’t do not feel listened to, no popular do not worry at the very least (or most you have been true you and have not be influenced by the dominant wave.) 

Fanciful fable a baby in a cradle
New life and new wonders able
A hand from “in crowd” does beckon
I walk in feel more lonely I reckon

I’m not those things you said “we” all are
I am not a part of a redundant single star
You say things as fact, straight lines so subjective
When all I want to be is “me” more reflective

A puppet on a string I cut them off and look around
The strings a still attached with words and the same sound
I got back to the “real world” so eagerly with open arms
It may not be perfect but honesty has its ethereal charms

I am part of the humanity no label defines me I shall deface
Of flesh and blood and gleefully I move from place to place
The words are rubbed away sounding through the sky
I now what I am from life to death a smile and a sigh

Paul Isaacs 2016


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“Autism” Is Not A Single Thing – So Why Is It Still Being Presented As That?

20160730_121048DIFFERENT PRESENTATIONS 

No one “owns” Autism that includes me, you the person next door- I think it is important to know what “autism” and “asperger’s” in terms of profiles are the presentations that come with them.

POSSIBILITIES AND OPENNESS  

What are the components? (information processing, environment, mental health, personality, identity, learning types) By looking at these pieces you can understand what to do (or not to do) there are many different paths so by being open to possibilities.

GOING AGAINST THE GRAIN

I know my views aren’t popular for one because they go against the status quo of “neurodiversity” that is fine.

LOOKING BEYOND THE RHETORICS

Has anybody wondered what autism really is? Has anybody can beyond the passe rhetorics, memes or generalised views to know how to understand it? To empower  people with autism, their parents and professionals etc?

LOOKING DEEPER MEANS LOOKING AT WHAT IS THERE

Isn’t it time to know what makes up a person on the autism spectrum?  Dig deeper? I can tell you this is what my autism is made up of –

  • brain injury
  • hemiplegia
  • developmental delay
  • speech and language delay
  • language disorders
  • tic disorders
  • mutism
  • related anxiety disorders
  • personality disorders
  • learning difficulties etc.

This took six years of research and self-reflection to get to this point.

 I say to people reading this do not remember me for saying but remember the template that is being presented and what you can relate to and do not relate to

LETS THINK ABOUT IT 

For a so called “accepting autism community” I have seen plenty of internal upset, bullying, gas-lighting, trolling,  arguing, tears and upset to last a life time. Autism has created a “culture” around itself and personally I have seen nothing healthy come out of it. I came into this in 2010 with my parents we quickly got out of it my parents still don’t “get it” the militancy by people on and off the autism spectrum and I have recently been reminded of why I stay clear of it.

The people and parents who seen themselves as human beings first  (not defining by their “autism”), who are living their lives not consumed by labels and redundant definitions are the ones who are great examples.

This isn’t a game and when you are toying with people’s feelings directed at people who dare to above the parapet a speak from the heart and not tow the line Is this fair? I am all for healthy disagreement lets start listening.

Paul Isaacs 2016


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Meeting Up With The King’s

 

This week I had the pleasure of meeting up with the King’s they are family that live in the north of England in the Wakefield. Sharon and Richard have three children on the autism spectrum Rosie who is diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome, Lenny with Classic autism and Daisy with Kabuki Syndrome and Classic autism.

Staying with the family was very interesting and reflective on my part, as all the family showed deep love and care for each other being honest about the difficulties and  balanced about them showing deep care and empowerment for each other.

Their kindness and humility was reflected in the hospitality shown to me and the others we met on our travels to the park during my visit it is sometimes the little things that matter as much as the big ones. I look forward to meeting them again.

Paul Isaacs  2016

 


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“Autism” A Wheel Within A Wheel (and so forth)

Seeing that “autism” has never been one thing,  I wonder if there will be a time in the future when autism will be seen as an adjective? When autism will been seen as plural (multi-dimensional)? Rather than singular definition (concrete/unmoveable)?

This would surely open up to a host of individuals with very different needs that could be considered, ventured and empowered.

This would be for all people on the spectrum who’s specfic realties and specific perspectives will quite rightly be acknowledged as their own?

Paul Isaacs 2016