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Living With Anomic Aphasia In The Context of Autism

paul-amber-2002-3Note that this is from a personal perspective 

Speaking to a speech and language therapist yesterday it got me thinking about my autism trajectory and what residual and very apparent markers of disability are still present and more importantly how they manifest and present themselves.

LOOKING BACK 

As a child it took me a long to time to speak and use language in a functional way this meant that both receptive and expressive language was hard to filter and decode into something that was connecting and meaningful.

LEFT HEMISPHERE & LANGUAGE

As I have stated in previous blogs part of my development was due to brain injury to the left hemisphere this part of brain is were human language is formed (although other aspects of the brain will connect with this).

THE PRESENTATION NOW 1  – VERBAL LANGUAGE 

As an adult  the type of a aphasia  (receptive and expressive) as apart of my autism would be considered residual in presentation and it effects me with I tired my words get stuck like a “blockage” and I have to consciously “find” the words which seem almost on “there” but disappear leaving me to have longer pauses or repeat “umm” for example.

THE PRESENTATION NOW 2  – VISUAL PERCEPTUAL DISORDERS & MENTALISING

Lacking visual internalisation means that I don not have a “meta-reality” which involves complex pictural referencing in other words I do not “store visual information in a coherent way” meaning that retrieval and word association when tired can be slowed down.

Having simultagnosia means I see things in pieces that has an effect on how I internalise visual information and mentalising (organising) and need to focus on movement, pattern and touch to externally map-out something rather than internally.

Anomic aphasia (also known as dysnomia, nominal aphasia, and amnesic aphasia) is a mild, fluent type of aphasia where an individual has word retrieval failures and cannot express the words they want to say (particularly nouns and verbs).[1] Anomia is a deficit of expressive language. The most pervasive deficit in the aphasias is anomia. Some level of anomia is seen in all of the aphasias.[2] Individuals with aphasia who display anomia can often describe an object in detail and maybe even use hand gestures to demonstrate how the object is used but cannot find the appropriate word to name the object. [3]

CONCLUSION THE PRESENTATION NOW 3  – ANOMIA (WORD FINDING)

It is completely understandable that not having an visual memory and having a long developmental history of language associated issues that word finding at times for me can be difficult but one much use what they have and accept what is going on. I’m glad I am in a position to understand what is going on and I hope this blog helps others who can relate to this. 🙂

Paul Isaacs 2017

 

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My Language Development – Receptive & Expressive Aphasia & Visual Agnosias

IMAG0083Note this is from a personal perspective

Overview 

Yesterday I presented a speech on my life with autism afterwards I had an interesting conversation with a lady who specialises in aphasia and language development so I thought I would go through my language trajectory.

Speech & Language Delay

I had both delays in speech and language acquisition this means that I was missing milestones on both these areas of language development – this was noted by my parents during those early years of development and I didn’t a level of functionality to my speech until late infancy.

Receptive Aphasia

This meant the the language of “the world around me” was a garbled tumbling mess that was feel of noises, inflections but not “meaning” in the typical sense at times I would be interested in these “noises” perplexed, intrigued even but it was very much a swirling bottle neck with the words being at the deepest part of ocean within the sea-back grasping yet not.

Expressive Aphasia

When expressive language did present itself it was not at the level firstly of my chronological  age and secondly what coming did not reflect what I wanted to say to people around me so there was quite rightfully and frustration there as words would “drop” both receptively and expressibly sentence construction, “word-finding” and neologisms which came in the form of echolalia was present and having created my “own language” (pattern, them and feel) before typical  interpretative language and unpicking that was difficult. As I have said I had before I had “words” within my head but grasping them, finding them and using them was being “blocked” by other factors.

Conclusion

Looking at my overall trajectory would say that I had global anomic aphasia coupled with additional difficulties created by the visual perceptual disorders and oral apraxia.

OVERVIEW OF APHASIAS 

Visual Agnosias, Simultagnosia & Semantic Agnosia – Related to Anomia

The word finding aspects I can split into two aspects firstly the nature of aphasia itself and not being able to use word retrieval and secondly the perceptual disorders (visual fragmentation, visual semantic problems) and not having “visuals” for words meant that making tangible and “concrete” associations was difficult.

I had to use a lot of tactile-associative strategies sniffing, rubbing, mouthing and sculpting my “external reality” in order to get a aspect of meaning I still very much “live in a world” before the literal so significance and bridging the gaps are important to me.

This meant that perceiving objects, people, faces was one aspect verbally being able to name them was another aspect of language which I found difficult.

Oral Apraxia 

I had this which layered the impact of speech production the use of my tongue, mouth, jaw and having a level of “disconnect” between the “words”, the “mind” and “body” not acting as team and going on there own path this caused difficulties in expression this carried on for many years and was notable present in observations of me at a CAMHS assessment in 1996 for at that time clinical depression.

Residual Issues Still Present? 

I would say the are in particular when I am tired this is something I have become more aware of as I have researched and got older so this means that sometimes my expressive speech can become laboured, slow and I can miss out words in sentences and struggle with “word-finding” etc. What helps me is music, gesture, tone, placement, telegraphic language and objects of reference to gain the firstly and foundation and then secondly meaningful association. However as always I continue to live life, experience life and enjoy life as much as possible with new experiences, friends and creativity 😉

Paul Isaacs 2016