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Autism from the inside


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Autism, Visual Agnosias And Making Connections

Note this is from a personal perspective

As a child my Mum thought I was “deaf and blind” and this was to do with both “blindisms” and “deafisms” this is how it presented itself through behaviours that I did show.

Baby Pictures Deck Chair I Year Old

  • Staring through objects and people and appearing “blind”.
  • Getting stimulation and “lost” such as staring at water, lint and small fragments this would include finger flicking and hand flapping to “bind together” visual information and give coheranence.
  • Poking the side of my eyes to create colours also forcing my eyes shut at night to create internal colours and shapes.
  • Focusing on mouths rather than a whole face (which I couldn’t process as a cohesive whole).
  • Processing people in “pieces” focusing on one part of the body and neglecting everything else (this extends to the whole visual field).
  • Getting an external “reality” from kinaesthetic/tactile association such as touching, licking, sniffing, tapping rubbing my surroundings these are my “eyes”.
  • Connecting with people by “sculpting” their faces, rustling through their hair and thus creating association/bonding.
  • Using peripheral vision rather than using my central visual field sot “shut off” a part of visual processing.
  • Being lost meant that others had to find me.
  • Fluctuations and distortions in depth percpetion, foreground and background.
  • Filling in my time with repetition such as echolalia, videos and music that are unconscious thought and “being” as opposed to conscious thought and “doing”.
  • Finding people asking me directly to “do” difficult jolting my reality this is secondary to langauge processing disorders, aphasia, aqquistion of “self” and “other” which is also a result of exposure anxiety and problems with direct confrontation.
  • Finding objects, placement and context has to be formed on a personal level that means all things of significance and relevance must be on display.
  • When objects are not moving their reality is not acknowledged.

Context, Language and Perception

Having a level of visual agnosia, simultagnosia, prosopagnosia and semantic agnosia meant that association and context was and is at times is very difficult. As well as having a level of aphasia which meant the visual/language link took a long time to bridge and form.

Tinted Lenses

Tinted lenses have helped bring a level of visual binding, coherence and an ability to keep up with visual information at a much quicker rate, recognise non-verbal cues and sort out my placement while moving from place to place.

Paul Isaacs 2017


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The Root/Trajectory Of Autism Is A Diverse “Fruit Salad”

Brain Lobe 2Right hemisphere Functions

  • numerical computation (exact calculation, numerical comparison, estimation)
  • language: intonation/accentuation, prosody, pragmatic, contextual

OVERVIEW 

If some one has an agnosia (perceptual loss) on this side of the brain this is called Social-Emotional Agnosia (not reading “facial expressions”, tone of and being literal) this tends to fit the profile with people with Asperger’s Syndrome. One is using the the left side of the brain (logic, literal thinking to get meaning).

So the Brain is Using The Left Hemisphere To Decode Information Because Of The Neglect.

RIGHT HEMISPHERE SYNDROME

Left hemisphere Functions

  • numerical computation (exact calculation, numerical comparison, estimation)
  • left hemisphere only: direct fact retrieval
  • language: grammar/vocabulary, literal

BrocasAreaSmallOVERVIEW

If someone has a agnosia (perceptual loss) on this side they may have an aphasia (language processing disorder) and process before typical interpretation (even literal) information so they loss the words (they become sounds), and they may have visual agnosias (face blindness, meaning blindness, object blindness) so they will not pick up body language this way and may rely on overt gesture and overt tone to get  “meaning” (using the right side of the brain to compensate for the left). less literal and less logical in their processing this could be someone with Autism.

So The Brain Is Using The Right Hemisphere To Decode Information Because Of The Neglect.

LEFT HEMISPHERE SYNDROME

VISUAL AGNOSIAS

EARLY BRAIN INJURY ARTICLE 

This could apply to people on the spectrum who have had and recognise brain injury as apart of their autism profile and how they have developed in many areas of functioning. From a personal perspective this article is very informative.

As a person who has left hemisphere brain injury (as apart of my autism), language processing disorder (aphasia) and visual agnosia this is I feel a step in the right direction.

Other Trajectories that Affect Development 

Paul… for some its brain injury… for some its immune dysfunction… for some its a neuronal migration disorder… for some its being prem… for some its hypo-connectivity… for some its hyper-connectivity.”

Brain Injury

Immune Dysfunction Syndrome

Neuronal Migration Disorder

Premature Syndrome 

Hypo connectivity Syndrome 

Hyper connectivity Syndrome

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Prenatal Smoking

Placental Abruption (Lack of Oxygen)

Vacuum-Assisted Delivery 

Toxins

Genetics 

and many more

Donna Williams

Autism & It’s Trajectories Are Not “One Thing” They Are A “Fruit Salad” Unique In Origin 

Other diverse factors exist in how a person is on the autism spectrum and my own are as diverse and person-centered as another person’s trajectory. It has it’s own “Fruit Salad”.

Donna points out it isn’t just one defining factor but many many different ones and it’s important to not only acknowledge this but to also understand it is a reality for someone too and factors they bring with them. There could be a whole mixture of different factors that contribute to someone being on the autism spectrum.

In other words not only is “autism” not one thing but also the trajectory defining origins/factors aren’t one thing thing either.

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN AUTISM & ASPERGER’S SYNDROME – DONNA WILLIAMS’ BLOG

WHAT IS AUTISM? – DONNA WILLIAMS’ BLOG

Paul Isaacs 2014