Paul Isaacs' Blog

Autism from the inside

To Friends for Friends What is Happiness? :-)

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 This is sage works, thoughts and feelings from social media when I said about doing a blog about “What is Happiness?” I am pleased with the diverse and really lovely responses. 🙂

  • being understood by people
  • Happiness is what you make of your life and live it to the whole without
  • Happiness is fleeting
  • Joy
  • Happiness for me is seeing my children happy – x
  • I think he’s writing in the broader sense x
  • Happiness is my aspergers. [13 year old] son making me a fan from parts he savaged from dead DVD / equipment and lego – powered by USB and a solar panel to help me with my [menopause] hot flushes.
  • Happiness is walking around with a clear head, able to observe and enjoy the surroundings without anxiety.
  • Or eating a different food 🙂 x
  • Still seeing my little one even though I’m away visiting my Mum who’s 300 miles away.
  • Seeing my amazing son grow from being an angry, confused boy who struggled with ‘the world’ into an ever growing confident , young man with so much to look forward to 💙
  • Happiness is my dog x
  • A fleeting feeling when things are going well. All the more potent when it arrives unexpectedly 😊
  • All of my children bring happiness to me. I am so proud of who they are. I am also happy when my baby makes progress.
  • Happiness is being relaxed, safe and challenged in an enjoyable way.
  • GBU
  • Happiness to me is enjoying the moment without stress or fear but feeling completely at one with the world and relaxed . Its a strong rich feeling making life feel good when you experience it. X
  • Happiness is making a genuine difference through collaborative and creative autism awareness workshops. Nobody wins unless everybody wins 🙂 Hope to see you at one of your future talks, Paul. Best Wishes
  • Happiness is our son being happy. (We only have one child) 😊
  • Doing something I enjoy doing!
  • For me, I think there are very different sorts of happiness. Perhaps the most intense is being aware that someone I love is happy; if it is because of me, that’s even better. Another is feeling that I have done a good job intellectually in some way and increased the sum total of human knowledge. Another is the great feeling of physical well-being that endorphins give you after you’ve been exercising. I climb whenever I can, partly because it is great fun in itself and partly because whatever stresses and anxieties are bugging my life, I feel great once I’ve worn myself out doing it. These are all very important to me.
  • Happiness happens when i’m alone. Its like my brain gets some high by being alone
  • Happiness is being fulfilled. I don’t think the pursuit of happiness is very helpful in itself but the pursuit of being fulfilled..? That’s a slightly different goal but changes entirely how you look at life!
  • Happiness to me isn’t a result of anything, despite its arrival often being influenced by certain things or thoughts or thoughts of things – it is the glowy thing, that glowy thing within, and when it glows inside me, it beams around my bodymask making everything else seem more glowy than usual, and it can be passed around and shared like a flowy magnetic glitter-ocean, though can also be snatched and disappeared at an instant by the click of the claws of a happy-snatching monster.
  • Happiness for me, is…
    As a mum: To see my children achieve even the smallest thing independently. For my boy with autism, especially, when he’s made an independent decision, and when he chooses to hug me and show love. For my NT girl, hearing her laugh big and loud with her friends; watching her dance and hearing her sing.
  • As a professional: Feeling productive and part of a process to produce something worthwhile. Being individual but within a team.
  • As an autism volunteer: When a parent tells me that they no longer feel alone; seeing parents’ reactions when their children reach out to another child or young person and socialise for the first time at Parents Talking Asperger’s.
  • As a friend: Being there for friends whatever in good times and bad.
  • As daughter: Just being with my beloved parents even for five minutes.
  • As a Christian: Learning to be what God wants me to be to serve him and help others. Thanks Paul.
  • to me happiness is knowing that I have the resources to deal with whatever comes up. Not much to ask hey? X
  • You can choose happiness no matter what is going on around you. Happiness isn’t just being content – God gives us the opportunity to see good in all by allowing happiness. But it is a choice.
  • I’ve come to realised that for me, happiness is acceptance of the journey. 😁
  • Easy company with the people I love who are wholly accepting of who I am. X
  • Sitting outside with family and friends during a breezy day. And having a bon fire at night.

Paul Isaacs and many contributors 2016

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Author: Paul Isaacs

Paul was branded as a “naughty & difficult child” at school. He was classically autistic and non-verbal due to speech articulation difficulties. He had complex sensory issues and appeared both deaf and blind. He gained functional speech around the age of 7 or 8 years old. He went through the mainstream school system with no additional help or recognition of his autism. Consequently, he did not achieve his academic or his social potential and had very low self-esteem. At age 11, Paul was referred to the children’s mental health service with childhood depression where he was regarded as “developmentally underage” and having speech problems. As an adult, Paul had a string of unsuccessful jobs, and his mental health suffered. He developed both Borderline and Schizotypal Personality Disorders in early 2007. He was referred to mental health services and misdiagnosed with “Asperger traits with a complex personality”, which did not satisfy Paul or his family. A local autism organisation put Paul in touch with an experienced psychiatrist, who diagnosed him with Autism at 24 years old. In 2012 Paul was also diagnosed with Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome by an Irlen Consultant who confirmed that he also had face, object and meaning blindness – conditions which Paul describes eloquently in his speeches and training sessions. He also has dyslexia, dyscalculia and also a dissociative disorder. Having started working as an local autism organisation as a public speaker in 2010, Paul joined their mission to promote autism awareness. His hope is that others will not have to suffer as he did. Now also a core member of our Training Team, Paul continues to enhance true understanding of autism at every opportunity. Paul has released and published 5 books on the subject of autism published by Chipmunka publishing and has contributed to other books too. Having overcome many challenges to achieve the success that he now enjoys, Paul’s message is that Autism is a complex mix of ability and disability. He firmly believes that every Autistic person should have the opportunity to reach their potential and be regarded as a valued member of society. Apart from autism related blogs Paul also write about movies, fashion, art and anything that is of interest. As of August 2015 Paul now works as a freelance speaker, training and consultant in and around the Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire area. If you are interested please contact him via email at staypuft12@yahoo.co.uk

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