Paul Isaacs' Blog

Autism from the inside

Egalitarianism & Equalism – Is That The Way Forward For Autism?

4 Comments

Egalitarian doctrines maintain that all humans are equal in fundamental worth or social status”

Cambian Event 2014 12EVERYONE IS PRECIOUS & EQUAL

In the context of the autism world (and my outlook in general) this is were I stand equality is for everyone, everybody who is in this world – I look at both sides of the the coin and take into account peoples realities (that makes me neutral/moderate/in the middle) that means that you look in a more three dimensional perspective of peoples diverse realities you cannot speak for all but one can learn from EACH OTHER through listening, experiencing and connecting. That is what is needed in this world kindness and empathy and accepting other peoples views.

That means the inclusion of 

  • Parents/Carers/Guardians
  • All Expereinces On The Spectrum (The Whole Spectrum)
  • Professionals In The Field Of Autism (Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Neurologists, Biologists etc)
  • Social Support Services
  • Educational Services
  • Housing Services
  • And Many More

EXTREMISM & MILITANCY IS NOT EQUALITY

No it isn’t is is quite the reverse it subjects people, suppresses them into a forced mode of thought and/or perception this means that voices potentially get lost in the process making people feel if they don’t go along with this – they are out of the “club”, lonely or worse. All views are of equal valor in the context. They should not violent, immature of disrespectful to someones character – all views even in disagreement can be acknowledged and politely disagreed with. This is why I am not a “culturist” or an “curist” but I believe in a balanced manner both sides have the right to their views it is in the way that they’re expressed and what is behind them.

DONNA WILLIAMS BLOG – AUTISM POLITICS

MANUEL CASANOVA – NEURODIVERSITY

A PERSON WITH AUTISM 

I also try my best to live with the good cards I was given not over-investing in my autism being the defining factor of my being (but having a healthy acknowledgment of it that it’s there) but also thinking about other qualities I have such as being a writer, poet and artist – I do have disability, I do have autism and I have a “mild” learning disability that is true but I am a human being first and foremost. And for someone to be seen as person equal to everyone else is a basic human right for anyone.

SOCIAL EQUALITY – ITS FOR EVERYONE

Accepting experiences is through the understanding that everybody was born equal, no labels, no social status, no preconceptions just born a little person preparing to grow-up on what ever path is grown from development, environment and/or otherwise everybody has the right to have a roof over their head, three meals a day, a wage/payment which can support themselves and their families, a benefit system that cares for the disabled and people with mental illnesses, a government that looks out for all it’s people, wars quenched not and man made barriers be fallen so every person knows the commonality of being human is that everybody is all different and let people be novices to other peoples experiences so another person gains anew. People all deserve the right to be equal.

Paul Isaacs

Adult With Autism 2014

Advertisements

Author: Paul Isaacs

Paul was branded as a “naughty & difficult child” at school. He was classically autistic and non-verbal due to speech articulation difficulties. He had complex sensory issues and appeared both deaf and blind. He gained functional speech around the age of 7 or 8 years old. He went through the mainstream school system with no additional help or recognition of his autism. Consequently, he did not achieve his academic or his social potential and had very low self-esteem. At age 11, Paul was referred to the children’s mental health service with childhood depression where he was regarded as “developmentally underage” and having speech problems. As an adult, Paul had a string of unsuccessful jobs, and his mental health suffered. He developed both Borderline and Schizotypal Personality Disorders in early 2007. He was referred to mental health services and misdiagnosed with “Asperger traits with a complex personality”, which did not satisfy Paul or his family. A local autism organisation put Paul in touch with an experienced psychiatrist, who diagnosed him with Autism at 24 years old. In 2012 Paul was also diagnosed with Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome by an Irlen Consultant who confirmed that he also had face, object and meaning blindness – conditions which Paul describes eloquently in his speeches and training sessions. He also has dyslexia, dyscalculia and also a dissociative disorder. Having started working as an local autism organisation as a public speaker in 2010, Paul joined their mission to promote autism awareness. His hope is that others will not have to suffer as he did. Now also a core member of our Training Team, Paul continues to enhance true understanding of autism at every opportunity. Paul has released and published 5 books on the subject of autism published by Chipmunka publishing and has contributed to other books too. Having overcome many challenges to achieve the success that he now enjoys, Paul’s message is that Autism is a complex mix of ability and disability. He firmly believes that every Autistic person should have the opportunity to reach their potential and be regarded as a valued member of society. Apart from autism related blogs Paul also write about movies, fashion, art and anything that is of interest. As of August 2015 Paul now works as a freelance speaker, training and consultant in and around the Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire area. If you are interested please contact him via email at staypuft12@yahoo.co.uk

4 thoughts on “Egalitarianism & Equalism – Is That The Way Forward For Autism?

  1. Reblogged this on Cortical Chauvinism and commented:
    A few days ago I asked readers of my blog on neurodiversity to write their opinions. The purpose was to clarify our basic understanding (or misunderstanding) of neurodiversity and emphasize areas of mutual agreement. It is always better to reconcile ideas and work together rather than individually. Paul was the first to express his thoughts. A little biography of Paul appears at the end of his blog.

  2. On one hand, I believe that most everyone is equal. We are far more similar than different, and that we all deserve respect.

    On the other hand, not to say you’re wrong, but we should also take into account everyone’s individual differences in dealing with people. Everyone has different needs and wants that need to be fulfilled different ways.

    Finally, I also agree that you are a “person with autism”. People are very complex in many different ways. I know some people try to see their entire lives through the lenses of autism or Asperger’s but one can get mentally lost easily doing that.

    • Hi Yuval

      Thank you for you comments – Yes I agree with you about other’s personhood’s and how people have their unique dealings with each other and that is important (I will update this blog again I think). 🙂 Thank you again. 🙂

      Kindest regards

      Paul

Leave a Reply - Many Thanks

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s